Press Release

New publication in "Nature Methods" describes the state of the art in miniature microscopes

20 Dec 2018 at 16:09

Bonn, December 20, 2018. Research of the neuronal basis of animal behavior poses great challenges for scientists. How do you get a view into the brain while an animal is moving freely? Advances in microscope development are helping to do just that. Modern miniature microscopes are so light that animals can wear them on their heads. In this way, brain functions can be observed while the animal is hardly affected in its behavior - an essential prerequisite for neuroethological research. The overview article by Jason Kerr and Damian Wallace, which appears today in the current issue of „Nature Methods“, describes the current state of development and highlights the advantages and disadvantages of current technologies.


Publication:

Wallace Damian J, Kerr, Jason N D. „Circuit interrogation in freely moving animals“. Nature Methods (2018).
DOI: 10.1038/s41592-018-0275-9

About research center caesar

The Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar) in Bonn, Germany, is a neuroethology research institute that focuses on the neural mechanisms underlying animal behavior. The institute is operated by a non-profit foundation under private law. Trustors are the Federal Republic of Germany and the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia. caesar is closely associated with the Max Planck Society (MPG) and shares its scientific principles. The President of the MPG chairs the Board of Trustees and caesar's directors are Scientific Members of the MPG.

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